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congress, including the deal on the bush tax cuts that were made at year end. $2.4 trillion of deficit reduction over the next ten years. and all also agree that $is.8is- that $1.8 trillion was gutting expenses and a little more than $600 billion of this was revenues achieved through the year-end bush tax cut deal. so everwhelmingly what has been done thus far has been in spending cuts rather than new revenues. it is very important for us to know that. it is very important for folks to realize that democrats are willing to make are hard calls about spending. we've done it already. but the question before this body and the question before the house now is going forward, what do we do to achieve additional deficit reduction that's consistent with having a growing economy? and the approaches of the senate and the house on this could not be more different. the house approach basically says that all additional deficit reduction should be achieved by cutting spending. by looking at one side of the balance sheet. i do not know of a business, i do not know of a family, i do not know of other u
>> we're back with the funds that will maximize your tax refunds. morgan, th is a real estate fund, a bunch of stock in real estate. >> this focuses on commercial real estate so retail, office space, apartment space. i like this because it has a low expense ratio and a decent yield. >> bill, real estate has been booming recently. right? >> you can get the same product in charles schwab for one third the price, it's a little like paying $11 a gallon for gas. >> you like gold and platinum. there is a fund that collects all of these precious metals. >> van guard precious metals buys miners. the reason i like it the nearly successful raid on bank kpas sits in cyprus made the world savers think about other ways to store wealth. >> cyprus. this is at a 12-month low. you are supposed to buy low. >> buy the miners themselves, don't go into this fund. i don't like the expenses. >> your fund is odyssey aggressive growth. why are you aggressive. >> they are basically a big play. look at these. up 15, 20%. really low expenses as well. great holdings in this fund. >> you like it? >> yeah. this
is back, and the $13 billion bailout in cypress. they want to pay for it by taxing people's bank accounts. dagen: the president will announce his no , nominee for s secretary. another looks at a man's record over at the justice department. connell: the cyber threats, a new report according to an isp, nigeria as being the worst for spam. dagen: the corporate tax burden in the country. who pays the most? those stories and much more coming up in hour on "markets now." ♪ connell: markets are going back to positive. dagen: who has a greater connection than anyone in the building. connell: good morning, nicole. dagen: good morning, yes, my mother and father were born in cypress, but i want to look here at the averages, a lot stemming from what we heard in cypress, them giving a vote to tax the depositors there, and that, in turn, could really pressure europe overall, that vote takes place tomorrow. the banks closed until thursday. the euro is at a four month low, and people are spooked. i mean, that's really what's occurring here, down 45 points for the dow jones industrials, so that's down
't read. there is a payroll tax of .9% and investment tax 3.8% and excise tax of which there are 159 rules to spell out how that tax applies. can you imagine how this is going to be? this is nightmare. this is so the federal government can hire millions of people to make this legislation possible. it's idiotic. they should break it around started all over. >> eric: and remember when president clinton said that it would not add to the debt and now it's trillion dollars? >> it's amazing people hate so much of it. let's note the american people when asked about the specific provisions in the affordable care act actually like it. they like tax credits for small insurance and closing the medicare loopholes and 80% of like those things and less than 50% know they are in the bill. >> let's talk about why this is going to kick in. eric they purposely wrote this thing, once it is in all the crappy things come out. knows what is going to happen to medicare costs and medicare or anything like that. good luck trying to find a doctor or nurse. they did this in purpose. they bam, smacked you with this.
the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close those special interest tax loopholes that riddle our tax code, republicans said no. democrats proposed to offset unwise republican cuts to medical research like alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes research at n.i.h., republicans said no. democrats tried to cut the special interest spending in the tax code to offset republican cuts to students who rely on pell grants but republicans said no. mr. van hollen: i yield the gentleman another minute and a half. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. ms. castor: the democrats in the budget committee proposed to strengthen medicare and replace the republican plan to turn medicare into a voucher program. all it does is simply shift the cost tour families and older neighbors. mr. speaker, this republican budget is not consistent with american values. it is not fiscally responsible. it is a charade, it is a capitulation to the tea party. it does not serve us well in economic recovery and the ways we want to grow america. it's a plan for economic weakness. it's a receding vision of american greatness. in
. he's planning this year to abolish the corporate and individual income tax, moving in a very different direction than the national democrats want to and winning elections with that approach. so there's a lot to be learned both by the failure of the romney campaign and the senate races and the successes the republicans have had at the state level. >> host: and we're taking your calls in this segment with grover norquist with americans for tax reform. the phone lines are open. democrats, 202-585-3880. republicans, 202-585-3881. independents, 202-585-3882. grover norquist known as an expert on some of these budget issues. you bring up the senate budget that we saw from budget chairwoman patty murray last week with. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget. >> guest: there are two major differences. they certainly go in different directions. the paul ryan budget balances in ten years and does not raise taxes. patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxes $1.5 trillion over the next decade. so what the democrats and patty murray are saying in add
their proposals on taxes. under their budget, the top rate is to be reduced from 39.6% to 25%. the a.m.t. will be repealed. the corporate tax rate will be cut from 35% to 25%. but you don't find one sill bell in the republican budget on how these tax cuts will be paid for. . they don't identify a single tax policy that will end. the republican budget would mean a huge tax cut for the very wealthy, several $100,000 a year and leave a nearly $6 trillion hole in the deficit that would lead to tax increases for middle-income families. that isn't balance. that is total imbalance. at the same time, republicans propose cutting $3.3 trillion from programs for people with low and moderate incomes, including hundreds of billions of dollars for food nutrition and medicaid programs. so i want to end by asking the republicans when they come and talk about their tax proposals to name a specific that they would address. it's not in the republican budget. name one, name two, name three. otherwise, it's worse than empty. the chair: the time of the gentleman has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin.
is trying to shoot down this tax on a medical device maker. >> the medical device packs is something that is a pretty bipartisan bill. you will not see a lot of bipartisanship there. dagen: brad, final word. do we really know what this will cost us as a nation and individuals? >> we look no further to the entitlements that the government had to perform before obamacare. medicare, renegade is going bust on its own. we created a whole new entitlement program where we could not even administer properly and provide the coverage to those already admitted. it is on a pathway to unsustainability unless something is done to change those programs. i have no confidence that obamacare will have any more success than the two programs i mentioned. dagen: thank you both. the well. connell: senators getting set for a marathon with back-to-back voting. they will be voting on amendments that protect the budgets. dagen: rich edson is live in washington, d.c. with more. rich: most of them are designed to get the other party to take difficult votes. the republican amendment drew more than 30 democrats i
, our chair says that this is a pro-growth, pro-middle-class budget. i say it's pro-tax, pro-spend, pro-debt budget. it's a budget of deep disappointment. it's a budget that comes nowhere near doing the things necessary to put america on a sound path. it's a budget that does indeed reflect the stark differences between our parties. it's rather remarkable to me the extent to which our majority party in the united states senate has no interest in producing a budget that actually balances and actually puts america on the right path. they say they care about growth, and i know they do. i know they would like to see the economy grow more and more jobs be created because we have had the slowest recovery during this recession since any time after the world war ii, at least. very, very slow. but we have done something to a degree we have never done before, and that is borrow and spend to stimulate the economy. and someone has compared borrowing and spending to stimulate the economy to the idea of someone taking a bucket, scooping up water in one end of the swimming pool and pouring it into the
in the mine. the amazing thing is that although the central banks have been taxing myself deposits, giving negative interest rates and by a depreciating currency, like 26% depreciation in last 10 years, the ecb would come out so openly. that is the shocking thing. and of course, people should be very worried about what happened in argentina. they froze deposits and withdrawals so that this could spread. as we look at the united states and europe and the way that the politicians are running the show, it'd heading for disaster. as simpson-bowles said, it is a cancer. there is a time when bank deposits will be threatened if we continue even if the united states and europe -- people go to banks today thinking that it will be okay to. neil: that is a good point. not that it would be imminent or a near-term threat. but the fear is, here is a vulnerable little country where this is looking like a real fear. what about greece? what about portugal? >> i mean, this is western country. the last i heard is that europe is part of the west. >> what is your fear? >> my fear is that if things go awry in
with mandatory spending or comprehensive tax refm. that is what it will take. neil: do you think that bernie marcus, the home depot cofounder, was telling me on fox news, the spenders are using a pr war, the strong stock market, improving economic numbers as jusjustification for more spend. >> i don't buy that, i don't think that the sck marke is as pro efficient -- prefish ent as people think, we don't need to been the budget, the way that the government calculates a balanced budget is a bad joke, we do have to do, we have to start treating the disease, deal with health care costs, deal socialnsurance programs. neil: they are not. they might -- but remind me,er dayhey don't, a new pore added to our -- a few more added to our debt. all unfunded. >> that is right, that is what we need. >> you local starkest terms. >> the full view, if we look at big number, over 70 trillio, if we end up doing -- >> how does that work? >> debt held by public, held by social security medicare trustee fund, and pensions unfunded, arrange of commitment contingency, and unfunded social security and medicare promis
to identity theft, especially during tax season. >> announcer: every year, millions of americans learn all it may take to devastate your life is a little personal information in the wrong hands. your identity needs protection, and no one does it better than lifelock. >> identity thieves steal from everyone. you have to protect yourself. i protect myself with lifelock. >> announcer: lifelock offers the most comprehenve identity theft protection, period. and lifelock ultimate was named "best in detection". lifelock's 24/7 proactive protection alerts you as soon as they detect an attack within their network, before it's too late. lifelock protects your social security number, money, credit, even the equity in your home. while identity theft can't be completely stopped, no one protects you better than lifelock. and lifelock snds behind that with the power of their $1 million service guarantee. you have so much to protect and nothing to lose when you call lifelock right now and try 60 days of identity theft protection risk-free. 60 days risk-free! use promo code: taxrefund. order now and get th
out and do these things they will talk about putting this tax on deposits, what happens from there? what's the fallout? imean that's a big deal? >> well, i think capital controls at this point is inevitable because even if, even if there is a deal, unless you have capital controls, there is going to be a massive is run on these banks the minute they open. but again, i mean we need to look at what is the alternative here? if you don't do the levy over 100,000 euros, you know, you are going to have a risk of the collapsing of all of these banks, in which case, not only the insured but also the uninsured depositers lose much more because the reality is in cyprus, the level of insured depositers is 180% of gdp which means that unless there is a deal, both insured and uninsured deposits basically evaporate. melissa: okay. lance, let's talk about what are the other options. >> sure. melissa: you talk why has the e.u. not gotten involved? is it their best interest to get involved? because if they don't, doesn't it mean russia sinks their hooks even further into this island nation? they wo
around incentivizing small businesses, 0-25, but offering them tax credits to make the cost of coverage from the employer's perspective more affordable. >> okay, great, thank you. >> commissioner o'brien. >> would you say in your opinion, that there is a lot of overlap between the two programs? i mean i'm trying to see if the health care act is left in case, which is obviously going to be the place and the other option was taken out, the health security, would that leave a wide slot or section of people that are vulnerable and not covered that wouldn't fall under the umbrella of the affordable care act? i'm trying to -- it's extremely complicated and we're finding out it's going to take a lot of work to research how these programs work on their own first, and then between each other. and i was wondering would it be easier to amend one of them to sort of just be adjusted to fill in the gaps of the care act that doesn't cover it? so that it would be easish to manage the whole thing? would time be sent better trying to engineer it that way, then trying to evolve both of them and kee
to be a temporary hike of taxes on but made them perm innocent locking in place an 8.8% top rate that could have new york's most productive residents taking eyes, and it's could take a hike, but will. i was thinking of that, will burr, it's another 9% on the top rate, close to 40%, half writeoffs saying nothing of the other taxes. you're paying 50% in taxes right out the gate. what's the deal? >> well, it's disappointing in that the business community, and the temporary increase part of the overall -- neil: must have known it was not temporary. >> well, no, we believed it would be, and went along with it as part of the overall reform, and he did make some good reforms, but this one is quite different. as far as i can see, this is paired with the $350 check being dulled out to sort of upper middle class people, and then -- neil: robbing peter to pay paul. >> yeah. neil: you think you were snickered? >> a direct money transfer from people in one income bracket to people in another income bracket. neil: so here you were trying to be pragmatic of this, this guy might be a different type of democrat, unl
it to the rich. let's raise taxes trillions of dollars. let's go and stick it to special interests like people who he provide gasoline at the pump. to raise taxes on oil companies. ladies and gentlemen, every time you raise taxes, you raise prices. and every time you race -- raise prices the consumer has to pay more for it. these are the ideas that make america less able to be prepared for its future and cost more money. that's why when you look at this slide you see where the laws already enacted by the democrats are leading america to where we will be functionally bankrupt. we are following theure peaian model exactly what -- the european model exactly what they have done over there for a number of years and now we are seeing firsthand, iceland, greece, cyprus just yesterday. this is the pathway that if our friends, the democrats, get their say, this is where they'll lead us. so republicans through paul ryan spoke about we want to make sure that medicare, social security, that the free enterprise system is alive and well by making these plans and the process therein ready for the employers a
on public servants, wasted money spent in the financial crisis and the only thing is higher taxes. >> there is an oversight of spending tax dollars, we have known that for a while. with the story with school superintendent, national average 162,000 to be a school superintendent but some of these guys are running half a dozen schools, less than a million students, some of them are making 200,000 or more. it is amazing there is no transparency, little oversight for the public servants will scream about the private sector. look to your own backyard. charles: the same ideology that argues about corporate salaries uses that as an excuse to bump up their own salaries. digging a were using to bump up your salaries? connell: thank you, charles, appreciate it. dagen: i am taken mcdonnell. connell: i am connell mcshane. thank you for joining us and this is what is keeping washington up at night. preventing a budget deal from happening. dagen: a big day for bernanke and company. is it time for the central bank to pull back on the bond buying? connell: and the taiwan factory making the recall
wanted to commend it administration for its aggressiveness in getting this person. a tax that may be planned by al qaeda -- attacks that may be planned by al qaeda. all of us should agree that the work that you have done and what the fbi has done since 9/11, really protecting the country against any massive domestic terrorist attacks, and all of your activities internationally, it has really been remarkable. not itscy, it was primary focus on 9/11, but as much of the country, we've had to focus more intently on this issue. i do want to bring you back home. my final question is about the budget and appropriations and the department of justice. we imprison more people than any other nation in the world through our state and federal prison systems. 24% of the doj budget -- you are at about 29%. it will continue to rise. at some point, we need to think differently about what we're doing with people. i have constituents, family, children, we all want to be protected from dangerous people. a society ought to be protected. people involved in wrongdoing should be punished. at some point a
taxes you can take until you topple the entire economy. this is the challenge that this week will have. this week republicans will have a budget that balances in ten years. the democrats' budget never balances. no household can run that way. >> let me challenge you on this point because here is paul ryan this week, and he laid out very clearly what he thought the job was. let me play that. >> we think we owe the country a balanced budget. we think we owe the country solutions to big problems that are plaguing our nation -- a debt crisis on the horizon, a slow-growing economy, people trapped in poverty. we're showing our answers. >> right, but the answers rely on $700 billion in savings from interest. most of the deficit reduction comes from repealing the president's health care reform, which nobody thinks is going to happen. so how seriously should this be viewed as a roadmap for a balanced budget? >> it should be very serious, because budgets -- >> you're not going to repeal obama care. >> budgets are blue prints and priorities. we lay out. we think obama care should be repealed. the
us up. it is serving iranians but not a penny tax increase. but in that environment it is unrealistic thing to expect a grand bargain and we don't want to hold short term policies hostage to have a grand bargain i'd love to see but isn't going to happen right now. >> this last graph is about japan. you brought it to my attention. you wrote a book at about the japan economics and the -- >> that's right. >> japan is the full-scale dress rehearsal for what we are going through now. people studying japan in the '90s were dreading what happened. >> if you look at japan, one thing you say is when you look at japan now you are glad the japanese central bank is finally doing something. you often argue that japan didn't do enough in terms of stimulus. i want to show you japan's debt to gdp. i guess if this isn't enough, than what is? look at what they spent, it paved every roadway and highway that you could find and it went from 60% debt to gdp to 250% and still it didn't. >> be careful here because that's is gross debt and the central bank is a smaller number actually. >> i have seen the debt
at as nation's governments weighs a new bank account tax. there would be a 3% tax for deposits under $100 thousand euros, and a 10% tax and 15% tax for amounts larger than 500,000 euros, country central bank declaring a holiday until thursday, when they vote on the plan, this is sparking investor fears at home, joining me now lance roberts, host of street talk live, and xena. partner and cfa, welcome all, great to have you here, lance, i'll start with you, i have to assume some wealthy individuals are having questions about safety of their money, have you gotten any calls, are you expecting any? >> i'm not expecting any but i would not be surprised to see people talk more about this in next few days it is very late tonight anyway it looks like they will preserve the under $100 thousand mark and go after larger deposits, but the question, here in u.s., could it happen here? probably not. but the question is, ha hasn't t already happen with standpoint feds suppressing interest rates, that is the rate less than inflation, negative interest rate it has already happened here. gerri: let's go t
to end medicare as we know it. nobody, as in the ryan budget, wants to reduce taxes dramatically on the wealthiest americans -- 39% to 25% -- and then take away deductions from middle-class people, good deductions that make sense like the mortgage deduction, the charitable deduction, the retitle deduction, the health care reduction. no, no wants to do that. and no one wants to eat our seed corn. investment in education, investment in infrastructure, investment in sign b scientific research in order to keep narrow loopholes open, reductions if you move the business overseas. no, they don't want to debate that. but now we have a budget. because of the leadership of the chair of the budget committee and the members of her committee -- and, by the way, this is no -- this is not a small group of democrats. it runs from our most liberal members to our most conservative members, all united around the budget that is fiscally responsible. it meets the gramm-rudman -- i mean, i'm on old guy -- the simpson-bowles constraints, budget target. it invests in jobs in the economy, and closes loop
to pick up. do not get too excited when all the obamacare taxes kick in next year. i would go into any of the markets like miami. the whole purchase to rent phenomenon, all the investors are jumping in and buying rental properties. the holster is wearing off on that. it did not turn out as good as they thought. look at those cities. vegas, phoenix, anything -- really, the fed induces this massive wild swing in bubbles. they are not sustainable. just watch out. dagen: anthony, it was great to see you. thanks a lot. connell: great to see you, as always. how about starbucks. this is a headline today. helps to explore different farming techniques. a disease called coffee rust. it has been hidden industry pretty hard. dagen: you can see through the pants. lulu lemon pulled some of its yoga pants off store shelves. the company claims the mistake impacts 17%. it was made by a supplier. lulu lemon offering full refunds to customers. they are trying to figure out what exactly happened. it is hard to make up a story this good. shares are down more than 5% today. connell: it is like christmas for
and a member of the ways and means tax writing committee. if you would, starts by bringing us up-to-date on where the house is when it comes to the continuing resolution and the 2014 budget. guest: the continuing resolution which funds the government was passed out of the house a couple of weeks ago. the senate has been dealing with that. they passed it last evening. it is back in the house, and we will likely pass that today, which is good news because one of the things that we included was the spending reduction, the appropriate spending reduction so we can try to get this economy back on track. excitingt is an activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of representatives today. this is a budget by paul ryan that will allow us to get to balance. that means the government will stop sending more money than it takes in by the end of the decade, which is really exciting. what that allows us to do is to get the economy rolling, jobs being created and provide more certainty so young people coming out of college know there i
taxes and pay cuts, instead what they did was they taxed bank deposits. they're calling it a tax. a lot of folks are calling it a seizure. here's what's significant. even small depositors below the insurance threshold are going to get hit. the original number for small depositors below 100,000 euros was 6.5%. they're working in parliament right now about shifting that and any other subsequent plan suggests that if you have insured money it will still get hit. what did we see over the week whend this announcement happened on yesterday? runs on the atms at the banks in cypress because they'd shut down the banks as a result of this. they stopped all wire transfers and you also if you tried to take money out they had partitioned out the amount of money that you were supposed to be giveing to the government each though there hasn't been a vote in parliament. why did cypress need a bailout? its banks are bust. the reason the banks in sicypru they bet the greek debt would not be restructured but it was. that's left a lot of them insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of
. it's going to open us up and it's serving iranians, but not a penny of tax increases. no way. in that political environment, it's an unrealistic thing to expect any kind of grand bargain and we don't want to hold short-term economic policies hostage to having this grand bargain that i'd love to see but isn't going to happen right now. >> let me ask you about the last graphic about japan. japan looms large and you spend a lot of time working on it. you came to my attention first when you wrote a book about the, you know, japan-style depression economics and the age of diminished expectations. >> no, japan was the full-scale dress rehearsal for what we're going through now. japan is, people who were studying japan in the 1990s are the ones who are dreading what actually happens. >> when you look at japan. one thing you say, you're glad that the fed, the japanese central bankers finally doing something, but you often argue that japan didn't do enough in terms of stimulus. i want to show you japan's debt to gdp. and, you know, if this isn't enough, then what is? look at what japa
kind of tax or sees sure of deposits. if approved it could give everyone in the country a bit of relief. basically insuring what is being proposed in cyprus really can not happen here. joining me with details is the cosponsor of the resolution, republican congressman tom coal from oklahoma. congressman, thanks for coming on the show. >> thank you. melissa: do we really need a resolution to protect us from this? is there a danger this would happen, do you think? >> people in cyprus probably thought the same thing a couple days before it happened. do we really need to worry about this? i think we ought to make sure. and look, i don't think it would happen, i will be honest with you. i think, most of our regulators understand how counter productive this is, how it will destroy confidence. it will give people not to put money in safe places like banks. but we ought to reassure people and ought to send an unmistakeable sign to our own bureaucracy, that congress wouldn't tolerate something like that. melissa: has there been talk doing something like this or could you see it happening? i have
. then we look at the three-year tax return and that statement. we do a lot of home care and mom-and-pop shops. we also do start ups. we asked for approval through documents. we work a lot with people who do not know how to file taxes properly. we are mainly focused in san francisco. we are small. we focus mainly on the tenderloin, chinatown, bayview, visitation. we do a lot of expansion. people start small through the credit union and then want to go to the bank. we know we are limited. we cannot afford to give out a big loan. starting from the credit union, we educate them about filing taxes properly and then moving on to the bank, a small one, expansion, and we work with the bank. the bank and credit union are similar. we do allow tax returns, projections. credit unions do not charge an additional loan or processing fee. processing time, on a small loan, -- consumer loans probably a few days. because we require a business plan, sometimes it takes longer. business plans take a while. especially bank statements. we need to see consistent income coming in. so far, a credit union
, bounty select-a-size. - uh, hey... - i'm bob, we talked at the tax store... i did your taxes. i thought you were a tax expert? announcer: major tax stores advertise for preparers with no tax experience necessary. at turbotax, you only get answers from cpas, eas or tax attorneys. and it'd be him saying, "hi mom. whatchya doing" and he knew that i was at work. and just those little things throughout the day, he'd always say, "i love you. i love you, ma." this is the unfinished text message that our son was typing when he drove off the road and died of a massive skull fracture. how one drugstore chain is making demands of workers -- ev >>> on the not for them to judge people's lives. >> live a healthy lifestyle or pay a penalty. how one drug store chain is making demands of workers. >> a new battle brewing over coffee vendors. ♪ [ singing ] ♪ >> and singing a new tune, how a musician is defending herself after make some gay slurs on stage. g an unusual step with its health care policy. >>> the nation's largest pharmacy chain is taking an unusual step with its healthcare policy. cvs is
: yes, we are at peak billionaire. [laughter] partly due to tax policies that favor the billionaire super rich, and partly due to cloning themselves for spare parts. lax la. [laughter] and now that we ultra-loaded are so numerous again, i'm gonna give the moneyed masses the news they can use--- this is colbert platinum! [cheers and applause] ♪ a quick reminder: this segment is for platinum members only. so if your personal food taster doesn't have a personal trainer, why don't you run along and see if your local valpak has coupon for irregular hamburger meat? [laughter] okay, they're gone. platinum nation, as the ranks of us superrich continue to swell, you need a ride that says "suck on my money sack," tastefully. [laughter] now, you've got your rolls, your maybach, your astin martin. but if you really want to turn heads you'll need the 2013 pagani huayra, an ultra-luxury sports car that can go 230 miles an hour with a price tag of $1.2 million. [audience oohhs] it's a vehicle of such prestige, that the side mirrors read: warning: people in mirror are just objects. don't worry ab
for medicare. or else i lose my provider, and i think that's a tax they are putting on people with -- bilities and trying to got to pay on their disability. and those with legionnaires disease or h.i.v., dirty needles. host: ray, atlanta, georgia, republican party. good morning. caller: good morning. very interesting conversation you're having this morning. i have found that most people pend a fairer amount of time planning for their vacation than for their retirement. i work with a fortune 10 company and have been with them for 28 years so at the water cooler hearing different conversations if you ask people how much money they have in their 401-k, a lot of them have no idea nor do they have any idea on the different plans to put their money in. it's rather appalling, actually. host: ray, how old are you? caller: 52. host: when do you plan to retire? caller: i'm going to work until i'm 62-63 years old. something about public america, i have a -- family members with retirement pensions about $65,000. being in corporate america my pension is nowhere near that, so if we don't save in our 401-k t
on the failed idea that giving another round of tax cuts will somehow triple down and lift up all the other boats. we know that has not worked. peter: the senate starts its votes on its budget tomorrow. i will start here before i talk about easter bunnies and march madness. connell: we do not want that, peter. we never want you to get into trouble. dagen: that does not get you into trouble with us. we go as far as talking about audio parts. right now we want to talk about funding the government. 68% of americans say it is a problem. connell: monica crowley is here with us today, as is leo kelly. interesting because of what we have seen in the stock market. today, with the market pulling back with all-time highs, it is not really about the stuff peter is reporting about. >> cyprus, his little country that no one really was paying attention to a couple weeks ago certainly has no whole world turned upside down. what the market has really come to expect from washington is delayed until the last minute, but come up with a resolution. the threat goes away each time they do this. dagen: speaking o
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